Medicine and Science, that's me! My name is Giusy Davino and I'm just a 22-years-old medical student in University of Salerno (Italy) with internet access!
"Isn't it strange
That princes and kings
And clowns that caper
In sawdust rings
And common people
Like you and me
Are builders for eternity?
Each is given a bag of tools,
A shapeless mass,
A book of rules;
And each must make -
Ere life is flown -
A stumbling block
Or a stepping stone."

 

Kupffer cell: the blood cleaner. 
This scanning electron micrograph shows the internal structure of liver tissue from an adult mouse. The sinusoids (vascular channels lined with endothelial cells) can be seen as pink structures running through the parenchyma. These contain red blood cells and Kupffer cells. Hepatocytes, shown in brown, are arranged in plates surrounding the sinusoids. 
Kupffer cells are specialized macrophages located in the liver lining the walls of the sinusoids and they are part of the reticuloendothelial system (RES). When a erythrocyte is not able anymore to perform their task because of various causes (aging, diseases), it undergoes changes in its plasma membrane, making it susceptible to selective recognition by macrophages (Kupffer cells too) and subsequent phagocytosis in spleen and liver, thus removing old and defective cells and continually purging the blood. Red blood cells are broken down by phagocytic action, where the haemoglobin molecule is split. The globin chains are re-utilized, while the iron-containing portion, heme, is further broken down into iron, which is re-utilized, and bilirubin, which is conjugated to glucuronic acid within hepatocytes and secreted into the bile.
(Picture by The Cell: An Image Library).

Kupffer cell: the blood cleaner

This scanning electron micrograph shows the internal structure of liver tissue from an adult mouse. The sinusoids (vascular channels lined with endothelial cells) can be seen as pink structures running through the parenchyma. These contain red blood cells and Kupffer cells. Hepatocytes, shown in brown, are arranged in plates surrounding the sinusoids. 

Kupffer cells are specialized macrophages located in the liver lining the walls of the sinusoids and they are part of the reticuloendothelial system (RES). When a erythrocyte is not able anymore to perform their task because of various causes (aging, diseases), it undergoes changes in its plasma membrane, making it susceptible to selective recognition by macrophages (Kupffer cells too) and subsequent phagocytosis in spleen and liver, thus removing old and defective cells and continually purging the blood. Red blood cells are broken down by phagocytic action, where the haemoglobin molecule is split. The globin chains are re-utilized, while the iron-containing portion, heme, is further broken down into iron, which is re-utilized, and bilirubin, which is conjugated to glucuronic acid within hepatocytes and secreted into the bile.

(Picture by The Cell: An Image Library).

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